Poetry About Old Age

Poetry About Old Age (no order or links (yet)/a list in progress)

“Autumn Day,” Rilke
“Beautiful Old Age,” Laurence
“In Praise of Darkness,” Borges
“Cezanne’s Seclusion,” Dobys
“Continuing to Live,” Larkin
“A Friend’s Umbrella,” Raab
“Foreseeing,” Bryan
“Gravy,” Carver
“He Gets Around to Answering the Old Questions,” Williams
“I Had Thought the Tumors…,” Paley
“I Worried,” Oliver
“The Flat is Quiet as Paper,” Mandelstam
“Meditation on Ruin,” Hopler
“New Year Resolve,” Sarton
“Now I Become Myself,” Sarton
“Leavings VII,” Berry
“The Buddha’s Last Instruction,” Oliver
“Terminus,” Emerson
“Ulysses,” Tennyson
“Om A Fly Drinking Out of His Cup,” Oldys
“The Ideal,” Fenton
“The Little Old Women,” Baudelaire
“The Oven Bird,” Frost
“The Way It Is,” Stafford
Sonnet LXXIII, Shakespeare
“What a Wonder I Was…” Berry
“Wild Before Winter,” Linney
“The Woodcutter Changes His Mind,” Budbill
“Aubade,” Larkin
“The Winter Palace,” Larkin
“Funeral Blues,” Auden
“Black March,” Smith
“Lullaby,” Auden
“I Look Into the Glass,” Hardy
“The Face in the Mirror,” Graves
“An Old Man’s Winter Night,” Frost
“When First My Way to Fair I Took,” Housman
“He Never Expected Much,” Hardy
“Provide, Provide,” Frost
“Lebenswsishietspielereri,” Stevens
“Crossing the Bar,” Tennyson
“Halycon Days,” Whitman
“The Plain Sense of Things,” Stevens
“A Prayer for Old Age,” Yeats
“Politics,” Yeats
“Moonlight,” Teasdale
“You Are Old, Father William, (Advice from a Caterpillar),” Carroll
“Little Gidding,” Eliot
“Her Vision in the Wood,” Yeats
“Reverse Living,” Glass
“Satirical Elegy,” Swift
“Art of Losing,” Bishop